Music Matters in Education

Dr. Michele & the MED-EL team enjoyed the music at the event.

Celebrating Music and Education

On Saturday, March 5, I witnessed the power of music for children with cochlear implants (and typical hearing). I attended “Cheers for Ears” hosted by the Foundation of Hearing and Speech Rehabilitation (FHSR). The Foundation, “…strives to assure that individuals with hearing disorders have the opportunity to develop to their full potential, enjoy the same social and educational opportunities as their peers, and lead healthy and fulfilling lives.” Please visit their website to learn more www.fhsr.org. This foundation directly supports Lurie Children’s Cochlear Implant Program.

Child's Voice student Liam dancing at the event.FHSR celebrated the power of hearing and the joy of music at the “Cheers for Ears” event. The dancing and singing children would attest they met their goal. The band of Joel Frankel with drums, guitars, keyboards, sax, horns and percussions had the children clapping, chanting and thoroughly enjoying themselves. Kristen Van Dyke, the Executive Director, gave inspiring opening remarks and then joined her son to rock and roll. Our own teacher Anna Tess was a volunteer there along with parent Colleen Powell, in her MED-EL representative hat. Colleen helped Liam and his sister enjoy all the fun.

Our own Learning Center teacher, Jeanette Hachmeister, has written two articles on the benefits and importance of music and brain development. Be sure to read (or reread) her Volta Voices articles: Music as a Teaching Tool, July 2010  and My Story, My Song, July 2014

There is research that finds that musical education for children with hearing loss contributes to the development of general processes such as auditory attention and perception, which, in turn, facilitate auditory-related cognitive and linguistic processes.  Conclusions point to musical training as an interesting and useful vehicle for enhancing the basic linguistic processes that are necessary for improving higher-order linguistic processes such as vocabulary and reading abilities.

So just imagine, not only can you truly ‘rock out’ but even become smarter by doing so.

So what’s your favorite rock and roll song?

Keep on singing!

Best,

Dr. Michele